Search:

Saturday | 10.21.2017
  Home  |  Current Issue  |  Subscribe Free  |  RSS News Feed   |  Sample Newsletter  |  Business Radio  |  Archives  |  Site Map
    Winter-2016  


Facebook Postings Offer Another Look At Candidates Profiles

Job seekers should consider cleaning up their Facebook profiles before interviewing, a recent survey that included both hiring executives and employees indicates.

At the same time, employers are learning to use Facebook to get an unfiltered view of potential clients.

Studies have shown that Facebook entries can hurt candidates particularly as they seek higher level positions.

Almost half of the respondents who identified themselves as executives said they were likely to make a hiring decision based on a prospective employee’s online identity or Facebook profile.

The informal survey, conducted by career and résumé-building website LiveCareer.com, gathered responses about workplace privacy and hiring practices from more than 6,600 users. Of the executive respondents, more than 46% said they believed a company should review a candidate’s online profile before extending a job offer.

Within the same group, 41% said they believed that companies have the right to deny a job offer based on the applicant’s online identity, and 40% said they believed a company has the right to fire an employee based on inappropriate comments an employee made on his/her Facebook page.

“Most people know that employers cannot ask questions regarding race, gender, religion, age, pregnancy or sexual preference during job interviews,” says James Freundlich, co-CEO of LiveCareer North America. “What people may not realize is the degree to which hiring managers can glean personal information about candidates by poking around their Facebook page.”

Executives weren’t the only category of respondents who felt Facebook could be used as a filter for job applicants. More than 33% of entry-level employee respondents said they believed a company should review a candidate’s online identity before extending a job offer, and 27% agreed that companies have the right to deny a job based on a candidate’s online profile. Within the same group, more than 30% also said they believed a company has the right to fire an employee based on inappropriate comments the employee made on his/her Facebook page.

“We expected the respondents’ age to affect their views on workplace privacy,” Freundlich says. “But we did not expect one in four of the entry-level respondents to agree that a company could deny them a job offer based on their Facebook profile, nor did we think over 30% would think it’s OK to be fired for something they’ve posted online. We help a lot of recent graduates build their first résumés. We’ll be advising them, as well as our more experienced job seekers, to go through their Facebook profiles and make sure they’re not tagged in comments or photos that could cost them a job.”

 


© 2017, Information Strategies, Inc.
P.O. Box 315, Ridgefield, NJ 07657
201-242-0600