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    Winter-2016  


Sloppy, Error-Prone Resumes Speak Volumes About The Potential Hire

Recent studies show, employees most recent sloppy or incomplete work in other staff members.

Since most of the blunders cited are really acts of sloppiness, it behooves small business leaders to be particularly aware.  If the resume is sloppy, the work will be sloppy.

RésuméEdge recently published its Top 10 Blunders in Résumé Writing, a resource that helps applicants avoid common mistakes and make their résumé stand out from the rest.

Small business leaders should be aware of these oft-repeated blunders as a means of weaning out potential bad hires.

The worst thing a résumé writer can do is fail to proofread the finished document. After using spell check and grammar check, says Nina Freier, company director, the writer should review the résumé line by line to catch typos. Then, proofread it again.

“Résumé writing can be challenging, requiring succinct points and a professional illustration of individuality,” Freier  says.

“The most important thing an individual must remember when creating a résumé is that they won’t have the opportunity to read and explain the document — it must capture a hiring manager’s attention on its own,” she says.

Don’t go overboard with creativity. Freier warns that over-the-top fonts and designs can take away from a stellar résumé. The résumé’s layout should also be in an easy-to-read format.

Another no-no is failing to provide information that helps a candidate stand out, such as fluency in a foreign language or special certifications. Listing every accomplishment should also be avoided.

“Be selective and use examples that are appropriate for the job. It is exhausting for the résumé writer and the reader to have an extensive list,” she explains. In addition, promoting personal goals, instead of the organization, is not desirable.

Using unprofessional gimmicks is a typical mistake, says Freier. Although job-seekers want to stand out, they should do it through impactful language, not scented paper or gifts. Résumé writers also often forget to quantify their accomplishments.

“Many job-seekers neglect to see the value in the number of people managed or amount of money raised or saved,” reminds the company director. “In fact, it can be quite noteworthy.”

Another blunder that résumé writers often make is failing to employ a qualifications summary. Freier says those first few seconds is the time to get across to the résumé reader the most powerful points, strengths and achievements.

Thinking that one résumé fits all positions and listening to random advice are the final two résumé blunders that writers commonly make.

Even within an industry, organizations have different needs and cultures, says Freier. She encourages résumé writers to do research and pay close attention to the job announcement’s language. She also warns job-seekers to find credible sources when looking for tips.

Visit RésuméEdge at www.resumeedge.com for more information on résumé and cover-letter services.

 


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